Soul Food for Healthier Living

Growing up in a southern black household, I’ve had my share of soul food. Unfortunately, the soul food I grew to know and love was not always the healthiest. A lot of it was filled with pork and animal fat. This type of eating often leads to many health issues and conditions, shortening the quality and quantity of life. Luckily, by the time I was a teenager, I had convinced my parents to seek healthier alternatives to traditional ingredients that are used in soul food. Since becoming vegetarian, I have filled my palate with a wide assortment of vegetables, fruits, grains, herbs, and spices.

Black-Eyed Peas

Black-eyed peas are symbols of prosperity. My family eats them for every holiday, and even when it isn’t a holiday. Traditionally, they are cooked with ham, but it’s time to stir away from pork and meat flavoring.

Black-Eyed Pea Salad retrieved from “Down Home with the Neely’s” on the Food Network

Black-Eyed Pea Soup with Collard Greens and Red Bell Pepper retrieved from Food on the Table

Collard Greens

Collard greens can be used in a wide-range of recipes and are a staple of the African American and southern community. We love collard greens, especially with a lot of spice.

Spicy Collard Greens with Rice retrieved from Vegenista

Collards Stuffed with Red Beans and Rice retrieved from Fat Free Vegan

Collard Greens with Onion and Tomato retrieved from About Food

Red Beans and Rice

Red beans and rice are a flavorful staple of Creole cooking, enjoyed in both the United States and in Haiti.

Vegan Red Beans and Rice retrieved from Healthy Eating Rocks

Candied Yams

Candied yams are simply delicious and are often baked with marshmallows. There are other ways to make candied yams with simply and natural ingredients.

Candied Yams retrieved from Yummy Plants

Cornbread

Cornbread can be done so many different ways. Some people love sweet cornbread and some people love savory cornbread.

Jalapeno and Honey Cornbread retrieved from That Was Vegan

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